South Carolina Power of Attorney Forms

The South Carolina Power of Attorney Forms are a group of documents used to let one person, known as the Principal, to give another person, known as the Attorney-in-Fact or Agent, the authority to act on their behalf. There are many different ways these kinds of agreements can be classified, but the most common and important to know are Springing or Immediate, indicating the agreement will go into effect after the Principal has been incapacitated or immediately upon being signed, respectively.

Form Description Types

South Carolina Durable Power of Attorney Form

A South Carolina Durable Power of Attorney Form is designed to continue working even after the Principal has been declared incapacitated. There are many physical or mental conditions that may make a person incapable of making their own decisions, but…Read more ›

South Carolina General Power of Attorney Form

A South Carolina General Power of Attorney Form is designed to give the Attorney-in-Fact blanket power over the Principal’s affairs. These agreements are usually financial in nature, ensuring the Attorney-in-Fact can manage the Principal’s bank accounts, investments and utilities. It…Read more ›

South Carolina Medical Power of Attorney Form

A South Carolina Medical Power of Attorney Form is designed to give the Attorney-in-Fact the authority to make decisions about the Principal’s medical treatments or health care. These agreements are almost always Springing and are always Durable, as they would…Read more ›

South Carolina Limited Power of Attorney Form

A South Carolina Limited Power of Attorney Form is designed to give the Attorney-in-Fact a single power from the Principal or a single task to perform on behalf of the Principal. This is usually for a Principal who wishes to…Read more ›

Which form the Principal needs depends on what powers they wish to grant to their Attorney-in-Fact. While there are some more specialized forms available, the following forms can usually be customized to meet essentially all of a Principal’s needs.

South Carolina Power of Attorney Law

  • South Carolina Code of Laws, Title 62