Vermont Power of Attorney Forms

The Vermont Power of Attorney Forms are a set of agreements that are drafted when one person (known as the Principal) wishes to grant another person (known as the Attorney-in-Fact or Agent) the legal authority to act in their place. There are a variety of reasons a Principal might draft these agreements, from simply needed another person to handle aspects of the Principal’s finances to needing another person to make decisions about their medical treatment when they are incapable.

Form Description Types

Vermont Durable Power of Attorney Form

The Vermont Durable Power of Attorney Form is designed to let the Agent retain their authority, even if the Principal is declared incapable of making their own decisions by a doctor. These agreements are usually known as Springing, which means…Read more ›

Vermont General Power of Attorney Form

The Vermont General Power of Attorney Form is designed for a Principal who needs as much assistance managing their fiscal responsibilities as possible. It achieves this by giving the Agent blanket power to manage the Principal’s financial affairs, such as…Read more ›

Vermont Medical Power of Attorney Form

The Vermont Medical Power of Attorney Form is designed for a Principal who wants an Agent to manage their medical treatments and health care. This is the only kind of agreement that can give an Agent this power, as Medical…Read more ›

Vermont Limited Power of Attorney Form

The Vermont Limited Power of Attorney Form is designed to give the Agent a single fixed power or set of powers. Usually this is to perform a specific action or task on behalf of the Principal, such as filing taxes,…Read more ›

While there are a variety of Power of Attorney agreements, the following forms are the most common examples. The Principal should consider which kind of form they want to draft carefully, as each gives different powers and under different circumstances. While there may be more specialized forms, the following agreements can generally be adapted to meet any of the Principal’s needs.

Vermont Power of Attorney Law

  • Vermont Statutes, Title 14, Chapter 123